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Dubai banking major improves facilities for disabled customers

Dubai’s biggest bank, Emirates NBD, has expanded its disability-friendly branch network to include the Hamriya, Rashidya and Al Aweer branches, in addition to the Jumeirah and Jumeirah Emirates Towers branches.

The bank said in a statement that it has also implemented the distribution of Braille currency in its Jumeirah branch for customers with vision disabilities.

It added that it “will remain committed” to enabling financial inclusion for people with disabilities in the UAE into 2017.

To enhance mobility access, branches have been equipped with sliding doors, accessible low-height ATMs and cheque writing counters, in addition to designated car parking spots.

To provide people with visual impairment ease of direction within the branch, floor indicators have also been installed.

All branches also offer priority queuing and a separate waiting area to provide an easier and more elevated branch experience for people with disabilities.

Husam Al Sayed, group chief human resource officer at Emirates NBD said: “Step by step, we are working to transform our entire institution into one that caters to the needs of people with disabilities in the UAE and furthers their financial inclusion and independence.”

The bank will also be launching the distribution of Braille currency, issued by the Central Bank of the UAE, in its Jumeirah branch.

Ahmed Al Marzouqi, executive vice president and general manager of Retail Distribution at Emirates NBD added: “With the introduction of Braille currency in our branches, we hope to set an example in the UAE banking industry and offer our customers with visual disabilities the ability to manage their own cash transactions.”

He said Emirates NBD’s commitment to people with disabilities supports an initiative launched by Sheikh Hamdan bin Mohammed Al Maktoum, Crown Prince of Dubai, that aims to transform Dubai into a disability-friendly city by 2020.

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