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8 Are Arrested in Connection With Tunisia Attack

By CARLOTTA GALL
July 2, 2015

TUNIS — The Tunisian authorities said on Thursday that eight people had been arrested in connection with the massacre of 38 foreign tourists at the beachside resort of Sousse last Friday.

Kamel Jendoubi, the minister responsible for coordinating the response to the attack, said that 12 people had been interrogated by the police, and that eight of them had been detained, pending charges.

The gunman, Seifeddine Rezgui, 24, was shot to death by the police on a side street after killing 38 people and wounding 39 in the attack at the Imperial Marhaba Hotel.

Sofiane Selliti, a spokesman for the public prosecutor, said 18 people were killed on the beach, five by the pool, four by the indoor pool and three at the administration offices, with the remaining victims found in other parts of the resort.

Map | Three Attacks In Three Hours Friday’s attacks in France, Tunisia and Kuwait came at roughly the same time, but there was no immediate indication that they had been coordinated.

Divers have retrieved a cellphone that Mr. Rezgui had used just before the attack and then threw into the sea, Mr. Selliti said.

Officials have said that Mr. Rezgui was the lone attacker, but they have also suggested that he had accomplices, including someone who dropped him off near the hotel, lookouts who watched the site and others who helped plan the attack.

Mr. Jendoubi said that 1,300 armed security guards were being deployed to guard Tunisia’s tourist hotels. Each hotel will now have two armed guards monitoring access from the beach, and two more stationed inside.

All of the dead have been identified, with 30 coming from Britain, two each from Ireland, Germany and Belgium, and one each from Portugal and Russia. One patient remains in critical condition.

Correction: July 2, 2015

An earlier version of this article misstated the number of armed security guards being deployed to guard Tunisia’s tourist hotels. It was 1,300, not 1,700.

Farah Samti contributed reporting.